I have been reading off and on The Weapon of Prayer by E.M. Bounds. This book, along with Bounds other works, The Power of Prayer and Purpose in Prayer, have greatly influenced my focus and understanding of prayer. E.M. Bounds constantly references Bible passages and Biblical characters to illustrate his thoughts on prayer, but he also mentions several modern examples as well. One of the men he mentions is David Brainerd. The man, David Brainerd, has impacted my fervor for prayer in immense ways and it is good to know that I was not the only one. Countless men have directly attributed Brainerd to their outlook on missions, dedication to prayer, and devotion for God. In fact, Jonathan Edwards, John Wesley and William Carey were all directly influenced by David Brainerd’s life and ministry.

Dr. A. J. Gordon speaks thus of Brainerd

In passing through Northampton, Mass., I went into the old cemetery, swept off the snow that lay on the top of the slab, and I read these simple words: “Sacred to the memory of David Brainerd, the faithful and devoted missionary to the Susquehanna, Delaware and Stockbridge Indians of America, who died in this town, October 8th, 1717.”

Now this man prayed in secret in the forest. A little while afterward, William Carey read his life, and by its impulse he went to India. Payson read it as a young man, over twenty years old, and he said that he had never been so impressed by anything in his life by the story of Brainerd. Murray McCheyne read it and he likewise was impressed by it.

But all I care is simply to enforce this thought, that the hidden life, a life whose days are spent in communion with God, in trying to reach the source of power, is the life that moves the world. 

Let us pursue “the hidden life” with God, over the                  life without God.

This coming Sunday I am preaching on Philippians 2:19-30. The passage includes three characters: Paul, Timothy, and Epaphroditus. These three characters are all unique in their own way and each serve God in their own way. Each of them have received unique gifts and developed their talents for His glory and for His service. This passage gives a great opportunity to talk about the unity of the body of Christ and the usefulness of each member of that body utilizing their God-given spiritual gifts for His service and in His church.

To illustrate this point here is a personality profile chart for the Myers-Briggs Personality Profile test as it relates to Biblical characters.

I have done this test a couple of times and my personality was mostly ESFJ and some ENTJ. Mostly David and some of Paul.

If you would like you can take one of those personality profiles here:JUNG Personality Test

Who Are You?

C.S. Lewis talks of toys coming to life before Pixar’s movie Toy Story was ever even a thought. This selection from C.S. Lewis’s Mere Christianity has helped to illustrate the scripture passage I am preaching on this Sunday, Philippians 2:5-11. It speaks of Christ who was in the form of God, did not view his status as something he had to hold on too but was willing to be subjected as a servant, made in the likeness of a human and humbled himself and became obedient to the point of death, even the death of a cross.

Read now how C.S. Lewis illustrates this gospel message through the illustration of a toy soldier coming to life.

5. The Obstinate Toy Soldiers

The Son of God became a man to enable men to become sons of God. We do not know-anyway, I do not know-how things would have worked if the human race had never rebelled against God and joined the enemy. Perhaps every man would have been “in Christ,” would have shared the life of the Son of God, from the moment he was born. Perhaps the Bios or natural life would have been drawn up into the Zoe, the uncreated life, at once and as a matter of course. But that is guesswork. You and I are concerned with the way things work now.

And the present state of things is this. The two kinds of life are now not only different (they would always have been that) but actually opposed. The natural life in each of us is something self-centred, something that wants to be petted and admired, to take advantage of other lives, to exploit the whole universe. And especially it wants to be left to itself: to keep well away from anything better or stronger or higher than it, anything that might make it feel small. It is afraid of the light and air of the spiritual world, just as people who have been brought up to be dirty are afraid of a bath. And in a sense it is quite right It knows that if the spiritual life gets hold of it, all its self-centredness and self-will are going to be killed and it is ready to fight tooth and nail to avoid that.

Did you ever think, when you were a child, what fun it would be if your toys could come to life? Well suppose you could really have brought them to life. Imagine turning a tin soldier into a real little man. It would involve turning the tin into flesh. And suppose the tin soldier did not like it He is not interested in flesh; all he sees is that the tin is being spoilt He thinks you are killing him. He will do everything he can to prevent you. He will not be made into a man if he can help it.

What you would have done about that tin soldier I do not know. But what God did about us was this. The Second Person in God, the Son, became human Himself: was born into the world as an actual man-a real man of a particular height, with hair of a particular colour, speaking a particular language, weighing so many stone. The Eternal Being, who knows everything and who created the whole universe, became not only a man but (before that) a baby, and before that a foetus inside a Woman’s body. If you want to get the hang of it, think how you would like to become a slug or a crab.

The result of this was that you now had one man who really was what all men were intended to be: one man in whom the created life, derived from his Mother, allowed itself to be completely and perfectly turned into the begotten life. The natural human creature in Him was taken up fully into the divine Son. Thus in one instance humanity had, so to speak, arrived: had passed into the life of Christ. And because the whole difficulty for us is that the natural life has to be, in a sense, “killed,” He chose an earthly career which involved the killing of His human desires at every turn-poverty, misunderstanding from His own family, betrayal by one of His intimate friends, being jeered at and manhandled by the Police, and execution by torture. And then, after being thus killed-killed every day in a sense-the human creature in Him, because it was united to the divine Son, came to life again. The Man in Christ rose again: not only the God. That is the whole point For the first time we saw a real man. One tin soldier-real tin, just like the rest-had come fully and splendidly alive.

And here, of course, we come to the point where my illustration about the tin soldier breaks down. In the case of real toy soldiers or statues, if one came to life, it would obviously make no difference to the rest. They are all separate. But human beings are not. They look separate because you see them walking about separately. But then, we are so made that we can see only the present moment. If we could see the past, then of course it would look different. For there was a time when every man was part of his mother, and (earlier still) part of his father as well: and when they were part of his grandparents. If you could see humanity spread out in time, as God sees it, it would not look like a lot of separate things dotted about. It would look like one single growing thing- rather like a very complicated tree. Every individual would appear connected with every other. And not only that. Individuals are not really separate from God any more than from one another. Every man, woman, and child all over the world is feeling and breathing at this moment only because God, so to speak, is “keeping him going.”

Consequently, when Christ becomes man it is not really as if you could become one particular tin soldier. It is as if something which is always affecting the whole human mass begins, at one point, to affect that whole human mass in a new way. From that point the effect spreads through all mankind. It makes a difference to people who lived before Christ as well as to people who lived after Him. It makes a difference to people who have never heard of Him. It is like dropping into a glass of water one drop of something which gives a new taste or a new colour to the whole lot. But, of course, none of these illustrations really works perfectly. In the long run God is no one but Himself and what He does is like nothing else. You could hardly expect it to be.

What, then, is the difference which He has made to the whole human mass? It is just this; that the business of becoming a son of God, of being turned from a created thing into a begotten thing, of passing over from the temporary biological life into timeless “spiritual” life, has been done for us. Humanity is already “saved” in principle. We individuals have to appropriate that salvation. But the really tough work-the bit we could not have done for ourselves-has been done for us. We have not got to try to climb up into spiritual life by our own efforts; it has already come down into the human race. If we will only lay ourselves open to the one Man in whom it was fully present, and who, in spite of being God, is also a real man, He will do it in us and for us. Remember what I said about “good infection.” One of our own race has this new life: if we get close to Him we shall catch it from Him.

Of course, you can express this in all sorts of different ways. You can say that Christ died for our sins. You may say that the Father has forgiven us because Christ has done for us what we ought to have done. You may say that we are washed in the blood of the Lamb. You may say that Christ has defeated death. They are all true. If any of them do not appeal to you, leave it alone and get on with the formula that does. And, whatever you do, do not start quarrelling with other people because they use a different formula from yours.


Thank-You Church

jordantmoody —  August 5, 2015 — 2 Comments

This past weekend, Robin Mark led worship for us and I had the opportunity to preach to a full house at Mascenic High School. I was so blessed to be a part of such a fantastic weekend with great people who serve an amazing God. Here are a few of my thoughts about this past weekend along with a big thank-you to all of you who helped out.

PROVE IT! (Phil. 1:27-30)

The one thing I didn’t realize about my sermon this past Sunday was that the challenge had already been answered by so many of you. I challenged everyone there at the service on Sunday to prove their faith in Jesus by their works (James 2:18). We closed out Philippians Chapter 1 by focusing on verse 27, where the Bible says, “Let your manner of life be worthy of the gospel of Christ.” That  means to be a good citizen because our “citizenship is in heaven” (Phil. 3:20). So since we serve Christ first, we should seek to live in a way that is consistent with the gospel message. When a body of believers seeks to do this, it brings unity in the gospel because everyone stands firm “in one spirit, with one mind striving side by side for the faith of the gospel” (Phil. 1:27).

What I realized after preaching this message and evaluating the concert, was that so many of you lived out your faith that very weekend. As a church, you jumped in and did not just sit back. You did not seek to do “good works” out of some legalistic requirement, but rather you served up your talents and time as an offering to the Lord (2 Tim. 1:6). So thank you all for ministering in a way that was “worthy of the gospel of Christ”.

A Big Thank-You: 

Robin Mark

I am grateful to Robin for coming to Hope Fellowship Church with a servant’s heart.  In his words, he was no” diva.” He was simply a man with a song to sing to his Lord. I know Robin was a huge encouragement to me as a young elder at our church. I was edified by his teaching and the advice he gave me throughout the weekend. He taught us “Why We Worship” through his words, songs, and actions.


Our volunteers served with such willingness I can’t even begin to describe it. So many of you showed up and pitched in wherever was needed. Wherever and whenever there was something to be done, there was a hand to do so. Those of you who helped with design, set-up, clean-up, food prep, ushers, sound board, slides, and so many others… thank-you!

Worship Team

You represented Christ in both your preparation and performance. Not that the concert was a “performance”, per se, but you used your talents to share your love for Christ’s gospel and His church. It was evident to all who attended, saved and unsaved, that you love Jesus and you want others to know about Him. You sought to remove any distractions from the gospel message on Saturday and Sunday by preparing and practicing in order to do your best for God’s glory. You have not wasted the talents God has given you but have maximized them for your Master’s use. Cale and Mike– thank-you for your immense planning and your (often unseen) efforts both behind and on stage to make this concert excellent.


Chad and Doug and so many others logged a tremendous amount of time behind the scenes. Chad had a plan for every detail, and Doug was determined to make it happen. And when we didn’t have a solution to a problem (like the air conditioning), God did. So thank you to all who helped out in the planning and organizing phases of this event. You contributed many hours of leg-work to get things done in order for this concert to happen.

The events of the weekend are over, but God still has much for us to do for His glory, so His work goes on. Continue to pray for our church and the spread of the gospel in the Monadnock region.
in and through Christ,
Jordan Moody

(if you missed the service this past Sunday listen to it here: http://www.hfcnh.org/sermons.htm)

concert painted verse sign

Sermon #3 – The Unstoppable Gospel Advance (Phil. 1:12-18)

Sermon #4 – It’s a Win Win (Phil. 1:19-26)

Catch up on what you missed from the past two Sunday’s Philippians Series. Next Sunday’s message will continue on through Philippians 1:12-18.

Sermon #1: Phil. 1:1-3

Sermon #2: Phil 1:3-11

I have been studying how to listen well for a Pastoral Counseling course at Liberty Seminary. This quote about congregational listening struck me as encouraging. For us preachers, kinds words and supportive comments during or after the sermon are extremely encouraging.

“Once at at preaching conference, I heard a nationally recognized African-American preacher discussing the “amens” and other vocal responses of his congregation during his sermons. Many of us were not used to such an interactive style.

He said,

“It isn’t just up to preachers [talkers] to get the message across. We need help. Preaching takes a lot of work from the congregation [the listeners] too. After services sometimes my people say, ‘We did good this morning!’ Now that’s real preaching when they feel like we did it together.”

Kollar, C.A., (2011) Solution-Focused Pastoral Counseling An Affective Short-Term Approach for Getting People Back on Track. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan.53

Perception versus reality is often a difficult battle for a Christian. For this world is not my home, I’m just passing through. Paul speaks of this in 2 Corinthians 6 where he talks of persecution versus the reality of situation.

We are treated

as impostors, and yet are true;

as unknown, and yet well known;

as dying, and behold, we live;

as punished, and yet not killed;

as sorrowful, yet always rejoicing;

as poor, yet making many rich;

as having nothing, yet possessing everything.

2 Corinthians 6:8b-10

We are treated as impostors in this world, and yet we have the truth. Help them to know the truth, and the truth will set them free. As Paul says later on in the chapter, “widen your hearts” that we who are poor can make others rich.

May we display the gospel more clearly in our marriages as we declare the gospel more compassionately in our culture.

– David Platt

This is my first official message to Hope Fellowship Church.

God is good.

I am thankful for His goodness. God has given me the opportunity to be welcomed as the Teaching Elder/Pastor for Hope Fellowship Church. Praise Him for his goodness and praise Him for my new opportunity to preach and teach the Bible to the body. I am humbled at this responsibility and yet confident in God’s grace as sufficient to empower me to complete the task he has already begun in me.

If you would, please pray for Jamie and me, as we begin this new journey. We covet your prayers.